A solicitor-checked online will in 3 easy steps:

Answer a straightforward set of online questions
Review, and only pay when you are happy
Receive your solicitor-checked will by email or post
Single will £29.50|Pair of wills £39.50
Optional printing & postage £9.50
£2,000,000 professional liability insurance for your protection
Money-back guarantee if you are not completely satisfied
All documents checked by a UK solicitor

Make a will online: a fully legal will writing service



At makeawillonline.co.uk, our secure will writing service allows you to make a will in minutes, at your convenience and for an excellent price. Once your will has been correctly signed and witnessed (full instructions are sent with the document), you will be legally covered and can relax in the knowledge that your estate is safe.


For your peace of mind, all documents are checked by a solicitor.

Completing and updating your will



Once you have started making a will online, you can sign in and continue at a time that suits you. You will find full guidance throughout the will writing process, explaining all of the important legal terms relating to wills and probate.


When you have finished making your will online, you can login and make free changes to the document for 28 days.


For even more peace of mind, our optional lifetime updates service (just £10 per year) allows you to keep your will up-to-date forever.



No hidden extras

Your will printed, bound and posted for just £9.50 per document




Make an Online Will


All wills are checked by our expert solicitors and, once signed and properly witnessed, are fully legal in England & Wales.
Single will £29.50|Pair of wills £39.50

How does the will-writing process work?

Before you start the will writing process you should have the name and address of anyone you intend to name in the document. Postcodes are useful too, but not essential. You will be sent a link by email in case you need to come back at a later date to complete the will.

  1. 1. Fill in your information securely



    At the start of the secure online questionnaire, you will be asked to provide your address and contact details. These are strictly private and are used a) for production of the document b) to allow you to login if you don't complete your will in a single session c) to send the completed document (via email). You can find our data handling policy here.


    You then answer a series of questions about who you want to manage your estate, who you would like to look after your children (if you have any), who you would like to inherit your possessions and any conditions you wish to attach.

  2. 2. Review, confirm and pay



    At the end of the questionnaire, you will be presented with a summary of the information you have entered and have the opportunity to go back and make any amendments you wish.


    You then make a secure payment of £29.50 (single will) or £39.50 (pair of wills) - you can pay by credit/debit card or via a PayPal account if you have one.

  3. 3. Receive your will, sign and witness



    Once the secure payment has been made, the will document will be emailed to you at the email address you provided, along with detailed instructions for making the will legal and receipt for payment. Shortly afterwards, a solicitor will check the document to make sure that everything is in order. If anything is unclear, a member of our team will contact you by email.

    You can choose to receive a printed version of your will by post for just £9.50 per document.

Once these stages are complete, you have a fully legal last will and testament.

Validity

Our wills are valid for property held in England and Wales. If you have property overseas, you should check local laws and, if necessary, create a separate document to cover the foreign property.



Our blog

Pets and Gifts in Wills.



So: you own a pet.

What happens to your pet when you die?

Well: hopefully he or she will live a long and happy life when you’ve gone.  Read on to see how you can make the best arrangements for him or her when you aren’t around. 

Woman on computer making will online and dog by Bruno Cervera

Photo credit: Bruno Cervera

If you make no other arrangements and don’t put anything in your will the following three things could happen:

(1) if you own the pet with someone else (spouse/ partner/ housemate) then they may carry on caring once you’re gone.  

(2) a friend or family member may volunteer and your executors might agree.

(3) there are lots of organisations that find loving homes for your animal companions when you’re no longer able to however, many of these organisations won’t look after an animal forever.  Many animals are euphemistically “destroyed” if they cannot be rehomed.

Rather than leaving it to chance, why not create some certainty?  Animals can be “gifted” in your will.  If you know someone who would be able and willing to look after your pet once you’ve died why not have a word with them now and ask if it’s okay for you to make it a formal arrangement?  You can make a will in a few minutes and specify where you want your four legged (/flippered/ winged) companion to live when you die.

You could also specify what animal shelter you want your animal passed to if your friend for whatever reason can’t do it (e.g. they move, die before you, or are otherwise incapacitated). 

In either case you may wish to provide a cash gift that follows your companion animal to cover vet bills, food costs and other out of pocket expenses.  This can be made conditional on your friend/ charitable organisation accepting the animal.  You will have the peace of mind that (a) you have control over the fate of your pet and (b) the person or organisation looking after your pet won’t be burdened by doing right by your pet.

If you do have gifts of pets in your will you should ensure that your wishes are up to date.  Each time you get a new pet you should provide as much information about it as possible including name/ species and breed/ unique identifying features and if you have it to hand: microchip information.  With our Lifetime Updates subscription you can update your will up to five times per year for just £10.  

As a final thought: did you know that you can leave gifts in your will to your favourite charities?  This can be to animal shelters to ensure that other animals don’t need to be destroyed before their time, or to any other charity you like – be they environmental, care, medical research etc.  You can find a list of all charities in England and Wales through the Charity Commission website here: https://www.gov.uk/find-charity-information.

 

 

Pets and Gifts in Wills.

 

So: you own a pet.

What happens to your pet when you die?

Well: hopefully he or she will live a long and happy life when you’ve gone.  Read on to see how you can make the best arrangements for him or her when you aren’t around. 

If you make no other arrangements and don’t put anything in your will the following three things could happen:

(1) if you own the pet with someone else (spouse/ partner/ housemate) then they are likely to carry on caring once you’re gone.  

(2) a friend or family member may volunteer.

(3) there are lots of organisations that find loving homes for your animal companions when you’re no longer able to however, many of these organisations won’t look after an animal forever.  Many animals are euphemistically “destroyed” if they cannot be rehomed.

Rather than leaving it to chance, why not create some certainty?  Animals can be “gifted” in your will.  If you know someone who would be able and willing to look after your pet once you’ve died why not have a word with them now and ask if it’s okay for you to make it a formal arrangement?  You can make a will in a few minutes and specify where you want your four legged (/flippered/ winged) companion to live when you die.

You could also specify what animal shelter you want your animal passed to if your friend for whatever reason can’t do it (e.g. they move, die before you, or are otherwise incapacitated). 

In either case you may wish to provide a cash gift that follows your companion animal to cover vet bills, food costs and other out of pocket expenses.  This can be made conditional on your friend/ charitable organisation accepting the animal.  You will have the peace of mind that (a) you have control over the fate of your pet and (b) the person or organisation looking after your pet won’t be burdened by doing right by your pet.

If you do have gifts of pets in your will you should ensure that your wishes are up to date.  Each time you get a new pet you should provide as much information about it as possible including name/ species and breed/ unique identifying features and if you have it to hand: microchip information.  With our Lifetime Updates subscription you can update your will up to five times per year for just £10.  

As a final thought: did you know that you can leave gifts in your will to your favourite charities?  This can be to animal shelters to ensure that other animals don’t need to be destroyed before their time, or to any other charity you like – be they environmental, care, medical research etc.  You can find a list of all charities in England and Wales through the Charity Commission website here: https://www.gov.uk/find-charity-information.

 

Pets and Gifts in Wills.

 

So: you own a pet.

What happens to your pet when you die?

Well: hopefully he or she will live a long and happy life when you’ve gone.  Read on to see how you can make the best arrangements for him or her when you aren’t around. 

If you make no other arrangements and don’t put anything in your will the following three things could happen:

(1) if you own the pet with someone else (spouse/ partner/ housemate) then they are likely to carry on caring once you’re gone.  

(2) a friend or family member may volunteer.

(3) there are lots of organisations that find loving homes for your animal companions when you’re no longer able to however, many of these organisations won’t look after an animal forever.  Many animals are euphemistically “destroyed” if they cannot be rehomed.

Rather than leaving it to chance, why not create some certainty?  Animals can be “gifted” in your will.  If you know someone who would be able and willing to look after your pet once you’ve died why not have a word with them now and ask if it’s okay for you to make it a formal arrangement?  You can make a will in a few minutes and specify where you want your four legged (/flippered/ winged) companion to live when you die.

You could also specify what animal shelter you want your animal passed to if your friend for whatever reason can’t do it (e.g. they move, die before you, or are otherwise incapacitated). 

In either case you may wish to provide a cash gift that follows your companion animal to cover vet bills, food costs and other out of pocket expenses.  This can be made conditional on your friend/ charitable organisation accepting the animal.  You will have the peace of mind that (a) you have control over the fate of your pet and (b) the person or organisation looking after your pet won’t be burdened by doing right by your pet.

If you do have gifts of pets in your will you should ensure that your wishes are up to date.  Each time you get a new pet you should provide as much information about it as possible including name/ species and breed/ unique identifying features and if you have it to hand: microchip information.  With our Lifetime Updates subscription you can update your will up to five times per year for just £10.  

As a final thought: did you know that you can leave gifts in your will to your favourite charities?  This can be to animal shelters to ensure that other animals don’t need to be destroyed before their time, or to any other charity you like – be they environmental, care, medical research etc.  You can find a list of all charities in England and Wales through the Charity Commission website here: https://www.gov.uk/find-charity-information.

 

What happened when Lord Tarly tried to write Samwell out of his will…



People can get written out of wills for all sorts of reasons.  This post will look at some of the better and worse ways of doing it – using the example of the Game of Thrones Tarly family.  With a spoiler alert for those who haven’t seen the later series’ of GoT!

The bombastic warlord Lord Randyll Tarly made no secret of his disappointment with his son and stated on multiple occasions that he wanted no part of his estate to go to the bookish Samwell.  His preferences were made clear when he said he wanted his other son Dickon to be his heir.

So: what might have happened when both Randyll and Dickon met a toasty end ahead of their time?

No will

If Randyll didn’t make a will then his estate would be split in accordance with the rules of intestacy.  This means that Randyll’s widow Melissa would inherit the first £250,000 and the remainder of the estate would be split between all of the living children.  That would be Samwell and Talla.  This could lead Samwell with a considerable amount of the late Lord Tarly’s wealth and his title.  Definitely not what Randyll would have wanted.

Samwell Tarly - ertacaltinoz on deviantart

Credit: ertacaltinoz on deviantart

To make matters worse (or better, depending on your perspective) Melissa would then have the right to make her will and choose where she would want her wealth to go when she died.  She would (hopefully) be more even handed and Samwell could stand to inherit further.  Fair, but it would leave Randyll spinning in his grave (if there was enough of him left to bury)!

Will with a gift of everything to Dickon

Bearing in mind Randyll’s age and high-risk pastimes (slaying/ hunting/ warmongering) it’s likely that he would have made a will.  On the assumption that as well as disliking bookish children he’s also a bit of a chauvinist we’re going to assume that he may have made a will leaving everything to Dickon  his favoured son and excluding his wife and daughter.

The problem for Randyll with this is that Dickon took the same toasting as him and died at the same time or momentarily before.  So – with no Randyll and no Dickon, this leaves us in the same situation as above.  The end result being that Samwell, Melissa and Talla inherit.  Again: NOT what Randyll would have wanted.

Will with a mention (1%) to Samwell

So: on the basis that not mentioning Samwell at all could lead to Samwell inheriting, and not making a will could also lead to Samwell inheriting Lord Tarly may have made a point by leaving Dickon 99% of the estate and Samwell 1%.  Sorted?  Right?

Actually: no.  As Dickon died before/ at the same time as the late Lord Randyll and Dickon has no children, then his share of any bequest from Randyll to Dickon would go to the other named beneficiaries under the will.  In this case, Samwell.  Samwell’s 1% would effectively increase his share  to 100%.  Worse still than above two options.

Gift of last resort

Randyll is running out of options here: each of: (a) no will, (b) 100% gift to Dickon, and (c) a small gift to Samwell would lead to Samwell inheriting.  One way of stopping your estate from going somewhere you don’t intend is to provide a “gift of last resort”.  If the people mentioned in your will die before you and you don’t update your will you can be left in a situation where either (a) the rules of intestacy are followed or (b) your estate goes to the Crown (i.e. the government). 

If you don’t want this to happen you can make gift that sweeps up anything that is left.  Gifts of this kind are often to charity and makeawillonline.co.uk actually provides a prompt to do this.  A gift to a charity is effective because most larger charities have been around for a long time and will continue to exist for a long time following the demise of the will writer.

If Lord Tarly had provided for a gift of last resort to the a charity, for example: the Widows and Orphans of the Battle of Blackwater Foundation or the Church of the Mother’s Dawnish Outreach Trust, then when he and Dickon died, the remainder of his estate would have passed directly to the charity.  This would have left Melissa and Talla very much in the lurch and requiring a claim under the Care for Dependents Act (the subject for another blog).

In conclusion….

On the basis that Samwell and Gilly seem to be on their way down south back to the family ranch at Horn Hill with Samwell appearing every bit the Lord: we can guess that despite his fame and fortune: Lord Tarly didn’t set his affairs in order.  Much to his chagrin (and our delight) Samwell seems to be on his way to a “happily ever after” situation back at the family seat with Gilly. Although: this is Game of Thrones and (at the time of writing) we are only half way through the last season…

 

Wills for British ex-pats



A will from this site will be fully legal in England and Wales, but the situation becomes more complicated if you are domiciled in the UK but resident abroad. Different countries deal with the probate process differently and you should consult an expert on local law in the country in which you live.

Make a will online using our secure website and take control of this important step in your life.

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